Jobs-to-be-Done: A Framework for Understanding Customer Needs in AI Prompt Engineering

Nov 27, 2023

In a world brimming with artificial intelligence, our conversations with technology have become as natural as chatting with a friend. That's where the magic of PromptROI sparkles—a bustling marketplace where talented creators, known as prompt engineers, master the language that turns AI into our most helpful companion.


Imagine each word as a key crafted not just from letters, but from understanding. It's not about algorithms or code at PromptROI; it's about those human touches that make AI feel less like a machine and more like a partner. You, as a prompt engineer looking to develop high-quality prompts that can be monetized, need to be able to shape dialogues with the finesse of poets and bring out the rich potential of AI to answer, assist, and amaze. Every phrase, every question, and every input should be delicately designed to evoke the most coherent, relevant, and engaging AI responses. 


But the question of the day.





How do you create a prompt whose output resonates deeply with the buyer's underlying needs?


The answer?


Jobs-to-be-Done (JTBD) framework!


With this framework, the focus shifts from the constructs of prompts to the heartbeat of customer intent. It's no longer about simply selling words; it's about embedding in every letter, an understanding of the job the customer hires the prompt to perform.

With this subtle yet profound insight, prompt engineers are not just expected to be vendors of queries but to become architects of user experience, tailoring each prompt to harmonize with the symphony of human endeavor and curiosity.



Applying Jobs Theory to Creating AI Prompts for Enhanced User Experience


To effectively implement Jobs Theory in the creation of AI prompts—those textual triggers designed to guide AI interaction—we must shift the focus from the technology itself to the outcomes users desire when they interact with AI. This adjustment ensures that prompts are crafted to guide AI in understanding and fulfilling the specific 'jobs' users expect to complete.



Here are detailed considerations and steps that prompt creators should take to create helpful prompts within the framework of Jobs Theory:



1. Identify the User's 'Job': Before writing a prompt, creators must first identify and understand the 'job'—the ultimate goal the user wants to achieve with the prompt. This involves extensive user research to understand their context, challenges, goals, and workflows.





2. Emphasize Clarity and Context: Design prompts that are clear, concise, and contain sufficient context for the AI to comprehend the user's intent. Ensure that the language used aligns with the user’s thinking and expression style.


3. Anticipate User Needs: Analyze common patterns and scenarios where users might rely on AI. By anticipating these needs, prompt creators can provide templates or guided prompts that lead to desired outcomes with minimal user effort.


4. Provide Options and Flexibility: Since users may have varied ways of expressing their 'jobs', offer a range of prompts that can cater to different user preferences and levels of specificity.



5. Facilitate Nuanced Responses: Create prompts that elicit detailed and nuanced responses from AI. This might involve structuring prompts that lead the AI to ask follow-up questions or prompts that guide the user through a more comprehensive interaction with the AI.




6. Iterate and Refine Prompts: Gather feedback on the effectiveness of the prompts and use such insights to refine and improve them. This iterative process ensures that the prompts remain relevant and continue to efficiently guide AI in completing the user's 'jobs.



7. Measure Success by Outcomes: Evaluate the success of prompts by whether users are able to successfully complete their 'jobs'. Adjust the prompts based on these outcome-oriented metrics.



Example 1: Job - Travel Planning


A user is planning a trip and wants to ensure it's within budget and reflects their interests in art and history.

Relevant prompts could be:


- "Show me a travel itinerary for a 5-day trip focusing on the best art and history sights in Rome on a $1500 budget."
 

Clarity and Context: The prompt is specific about the destination, the trip duration, interests, and budget, providing the AI with detailed parameters to work within.



- "Can you suggest budget-friendly hotels in Paris that are near major art galleries and museums?"


Anticipate User Needs: Based on a common scenario of value-conscious travelers looking for accommodations, the prompt guides the AI to focus on location and cost relative to the user's interests in art.


Example 2: Job - Cooking a Healthy Meal


A user wants to prepare a nutritious dinner quickly with what they have in the fridge.


Relevant prompts could be:


- "Give me a quick, healthy recipe using kale, sweet potatoes, and chicken that I can cook in under 30 minutes."



Emphasize Clarity and Context: This prompt gives the AI a clear directive, mentioning available ingredients and time constraints.



- "Considering I have kale, beans, and quinoa, what can I prepare in less than 20 minutes that's under 500 calories?"



Anticipate User Needs: Here, the user is assumed to value health and time, which is reflected in the prompt specifics of calorie count and preparation time.




Example 3: Job - Fitness Routine


A user seeks an exercise regimen that can be performed at home with limited equipment.



Relevant prompts could be:
- "Design a 30-minute, full-body workout plan for home using resistance bands and a yoga mat."


Facilitate Nuanced Responses: This prompt requests a comprehensive plan indicating the available equipment and time commitment.



- "What are some effective strength training exercises I can do at home without any equipment?"


Provide Options and Flexibility:
By not specifying the duration or intensity, this prompt caters to users looking for a range of possibilities that they can adapt to their skill level or time availability.


Example 4: Job - Entertainment


A user aims to unwind after a long day at work with a movie that matches their mood for something light and humorous.



Relevant prompts could be:
- "Recommend a comedy movie from the last five years that's perfect for relaxing."



Measure Success by Outcomes: The success of this prompt is contingent on the AI selecting a movie that satisfies the user's need to relax with specific genre and time frame parameters.



- "I'm in the mood for a light-hearted film, maybe a romantic comedy. What do you suggest?"



Recognize the Customer


When writing your prompt, you need to first understand who the users of the prompts are going to be and what they aim to achieve. The JTBD framework categorizes customers into three segments:


1. The job executor


2. The product lifecycle support team


3. The buyer


people buying the prompts might be addressing a particular segment at a point in time. So, different prompts could be created for each customer segment, and the output will depend on the particular segment the Prompt is addressing. So as a prompt engineer, you should be able to identify all these and implement them when creating prompts.



Each of these customers has distinct 'jobs' they need to complete, and it is crucial to identify these for prompt design.



Prompts for the Job Executor

Prompts created for the direct users should help them to accomplish their tasks efficiently. They need outputs that are straightforward, actionable, and geared towards solving specific problems they face in their work.

- Example Prompt: "Can you compile a report on the latest market trends for eco-friendly packaging materials?"


Prompts for the Product Lifecycle Support Team


For the support team, the prompt should enable them to gather insights on system performance and user interactions.

- Example Prompt: "What are the common points of confusion for users in navigating our accounting software, based on recent support requests?"


Prompts for the Buyer


People or parties interested in purchasing your AI tool need prompts that help them understand the value and utility of the AI system. These prompts must support decision-making processes, and often highlight the potential return on investment or reveal the alignment of the AI system with strategic goals.



        
-  Example Prompt: "What are the projected savings in time and cost after integrating our AI chatbot into customer service workflows?"



In creating these prompts, prompt designers must understand not only the syntax and mechanics of the AI but also the context and objectives of each customer segment. This nuanced approach ensures that the prompts will deliver the specific types of information or action needed by different user groups, enhancing the relevance and efficacy of the AI's output for each segment.



To implement this understanding effectively:



- Empathy & Research: Prompt engineers should have a deep understanding of the challenges and goals each customer type faces. This often involves user research and persona development.


- Customization: The prompts should be customized to meet the distinct expectations of each user group. For example, while a job executor might need operational information, a product lifecycle support team member will be looking for system performance metrics.


- Testing & Feedback:
Continuous testing with real users from each segment and gathering feedback is essential to refine the prompts and adjust them to better serve the intended purpose.


Understanding these distinctions and applying them when creating prompts will ensure that the AI delivers valuable, customized experiences to each segment, therefore increasing satisfaction, engagement, and overall outcomes.


Define the Jobs


Understanding the five types of 'jobs' within the Jobs-to-be-Done framework is crucial for prompt engineers as it helps create AI prompts that are not only functionally effective but also emotionally resonant, and attuned to the user's entire journey with the product. Below are detailed descriptions of each job type. 


 1. The Core Functional Job


This is the primary task or problem the user is hiring the product or service to accomplish.

- Attributes: It must have clear definitions and metrics for success.


Examples: For an AI writing tool, the core functional job might be to generate an original blog post on a specified topic.


Prompt Engineer's Role: To create prompts that succinctly address the core purpose, enabling the AI to provide relevant and precise results. This includes understanding the specific requirements of this outcome, such as length, topic accuracy, tone, etc.


 2. Related Jobs


These are the ancillary tasks that need to be completed to support or facilitate the core functional job.



- Attributes: They may not be the main reason for hiring the product but are necessary to achieve the end goal.


Examples: In the AI writing tool context, related jobs could include researching relevant keywords, ensuring SEO optimization, and providing citations or sources.


Prompt Engineer's Role: To design prompts that create outputs facilitating these tasks, allowing for a seamless experience in achieving the core functional job.



 3. Emotional Jobs


These jobs pertain to how a customer wants to feel or avoid feeling as a result of executing the core functional and related jobs.


Attributes: Often subjective and influenced by individual experiences and perspectives.


Examples: Using the AI writing tool should leave the user feeling confident about the quality and originality of the content, or relieved that it's saving them time.


Prompt Engineer's Role: To design prompts that contribute positively to the user experience, such as by providing encouraging feedback, ensuring ease of use, or creating aesthetically pleasing outputs.

In a world brimming with artificial intelligence, our conversations with technology have become as natural as chatting with a friend. That's where the magic of PromptROI sparkles—a bustling marketplace where talented creators, known as prompt engineers, master the language that turns AI into our most helpful companion.


Imagine each word as a key crafted not just from letters, but from understanding. It's not about algorithms or code at PromptROI; it's about those human touches that make AI feel less like a machine and more like a partner. You, as a prompt engineer looking to develop high-quality prompts that can be monetized, need to be able to shape dialogues with the finesse of poets and bring out the rich potential of AI to answer, assist, and amaze. Every phrase, every question, and every input should be delicately designed to evoke the most coherent, relevant, and engaging AI responses. 


But the question of the day.





How do you create a prompt whose output resonates deeply with the buyer's underlying needs?


The answer?


Jobs-to-be-Done (JTBD) framework!


With this framework, the focus shifts from the constructs of prompts to the heartbeat of customer intent. It's no longer about simply selling words; it's about embedding in every letter, an understanding of the job the customer hires the prompt to perform.

With this subtle yet profound insight, prompt engineers are not just expected to be vendors of queries but to become architects of user experience, tailoring each prompt to harmonize with the symphony of human endeavor and curiosity.



Applying Jobs Theory to Creating AI Prompts for Enhanced User Experience


To effectively implement Jobs Theory in the creation of AI prompts—those textual triggers designed to guide AI interaction—we must shift the focus from the technology itself to the outcomes users desire when they interact with AI. This adjustment ensures that prompts are crafted to guide AI in understanding and fulfilling the specific 'jobs' users expect to complete.



Here are detailed considerations and steps that prompt creators should take to create helpful prompts within the framework of Jobs Theory:



1. Identify the User's 'Job': Before writing a prompt, creators must first identify and understand the 'job'—the ultimate goal the user wants to achieve with the prompt. This involves extensive user research to understand their context, challenges, goals, and workflows.





2. Emphasize Clarity and Context: Design prompts that are clear, concise, and contain sufficient context for the AI to comprehend the user's intent. Ensure that the language used aligns with the user’s thinking and expression style.


3. Anticipate User Needs: Analyze common patterns and scenarios where users might rely on AI. By anticipating these needs, prompt creators can provide templates or guided prompts that lead to desired outcomes with minimal user effort.


4. Provide Options and Flexibility: Since users may have varied ways of expressing their 'jobs', offer a range of prompts that can cater to different user preferences and levels of specificity.



5. Facilitate Nuanced Responses: Create prompts that elicit detailed and nuanced responses from AI. This might involve structuring prompts that lead the AI to ask follow-up questions or prompts that guide the user through a more comprehensive interaction with the AI.




6. Iterate and Refine Prompts: Gather feedback on the effectiveness of the prompts and use such insights to refine and improve them. This iterative process ensures that the prompts remain relevant and continue to efficiently guide AI in completing the user's 'jobs.



7. Measure Success by Outcomes: Evaluate the success of prompts by whether users are able to successfully complete their 'jobs'. Adjust the prompts based on these outcome-oriented metrics.



Example 1: Job - Travel Planning


A user is planning a trip and wants to ensure it's within budget and reflects their interests in art and history.

Relevant prompts could be:


- "Show me a travel itinerary for a 5-day trip focusing on the best art and history sights in Rome on a $1500 budget."
 

Clarity and Context: The prompt is specific about the destination, the trip duration, interests, and budget, providing the AI with detailed parameters to work within.



- "Can you suggest budget-friendly hotels in Paris that are near major art galleries and museums?"


Anticipate User Needs: Based on a common scenario of value-conscious travelers looking for accommodations, the prompt guides the AI to focus on location and cost relative to the user's interests in art.


Example 2: Job - Cooking a Healthy Meal


A user wants to prepare a nutritious dinner quickly with what they have in the fridge.


Relevant prompts could be:


- "Give me a quick, healthy recipe using kale, sweet potatoes, and chicken that I can cook in under 30 minutes."



Emphasize Clarity and Context: This prompt gives the AI a clear directive, mentioning available ingredients and time constraints.



- "Considering I have kale, beans, and quinoa, what can I prepare in less than 20 minutes that's under 500 calories?"



Anticipate User Needs: Here, the user is assumed to value health and time, which is reflected in the prompt specifics of calorie count and preparation time.




Example 3: Job - Fitness Routine


A user seeks an exercise regimen that can be performed at home with limited equipment.



Relevant prompts could be:
- "Design a 30-minute, full-body workout plan for home using resistance bands and a yoga mat."


Facilitate Nuanced Responses: This prompt requests a comprehensive plan indicating the available equipment and time commitment.



- "What are some effective strength training exercises I can do at home without any equipment?"


Provide Options and Flexibility:
By not specifying the duration or intensity, this prompt caters to users looking for a range of possibilities that they can adapt to their skill level or time availability.


Example 4: Job - Entertainment


A user aims to unwind after a long day at work with a movie that matches their mood for something light and humorous.



Relevant prompts could be:
- "Recommend a comedy movie from the last five years that's perfect for relaxing."



Measure Success by Outcomes: The success of this prompt is contingent on the AI selecting a movie that satisfies the user's need to relax with specific genre and time frame parameters.



- "I'm in the mood for a light-hearted film, maybe a romantic comedy. What do you suggest?"



Recognize the Customer


When writing your prompt, you need to first understand who the users of the prompts are going to be and what they aim to achieve. The JTBD framework categorizes customers into three segments:


1. The job executor


2. The product lifecycle support team


3. The buyer


people buying the prompts might be addressing a particular segment at a point in time. So, different prompts could be created for each customer segment, and the output will depend on the particular segment the Prompt is addressing. So as a prompt engineer, you should be able to identify all these and implement them when creating prompts.



Each of these customers has distinct 'jobs' they need to complete, and it is crucial to identify these for prompt design.



Prompts for the Job Executor

Prompts created for the direct users should help them to accomplish their tasks efficiently. They need outputs that are straightforward, actionable, and geared towards solving specific problems they face in their work.

- Example Prompt: "Can you compile a report on the latest market trends for eco-friendly packaging materials?"


Prompts for the Product Lifecycle Support Team


For the support team, the prompt should enable them to gather insights on system performance and user interactions.

- Example Prompt: "What are the common points of confusion for users in navigating our accounting software, based on recent support requests?"


Prompts for the Buyer


People or parties interested in purchasing your AI tool need prompts that help them understand the value and utility of the AI system. These prompts must support decision-making processes, and often highlight the potential return on investment or reveal the alignment of the AI system with strategic goals.



        
-  Example Prompt: "What are the projected savings in time and cost after integrating our AI chatbot into customer service workflows?"



In creating these prompts, prompt designers must understand not only the syntax and mechanics of the AI but also the context and objectives of each customer segment. This nuanced approach ensures that the prompts will deliver the specific types of information or action needed by different user groups, enhancing the relevance and efficacy of the AI's output for each segment.



To implement this understanding effectively:



- Empathy & Research: Prompt engineers should have a deep understanding of the challenges and goals each customer type faces. This often involves user research and persona development.


- Customization: The prompts should be customized to meet the distinct expectations of each user group. For example, while a job executor might need operational information, a product lifecycle support team member will be looking for system performance metrics.


- Testing & Feedback:
Continuous testing with real users from each segment and gathering feedback is essential to refine the prompts and adjust them to better serve the intended purpose.


Understanding these distinctions and applying them when creating prompts will ensure that the AI delivers valuable, customized experiences to each segment, therefore increasing satisfaction, engagement, and overall outcomes.


Define the Jobs


Understanding the five types of 'jobs' within the Jobs-to-be-Done framework is crucial for prompt engineers as it helps create AI prompts that are not only functionally effective but also emotionally resonant, and attuned to the user's entire journey with the product. Below are detailed descriptions of each job type. 


 1. The Core Functional Job


This is the primary task or problem the user is hiring the product or service to accomplish.

- Attributes: It must have clear definitions and metrics for success.


Examples: For an AI writing tool, the core functional job might be to generate an original blog post on a specified topic.


Prompt Engineer's Role: To create prompts that succinctly address the core purpose, enabling the AI to provide relevant and precise results. This includes understanding the specific requirements of this outcome, such as length, topic accuracy, tone, etc.


 2. Related Jobs


These are the ancillary tasks that need to be completed to support or facilitate the core functional job.



- Attributes: They may not be the main reason for hiring the product but are necessary to achieve the end goal.


Examples: In the AI writing tool context, related jobs could include researching relevant keywords, ensuring SEO optimization, and providing citations or sources.


Prompt Engineer's Role: To design prompts that create outputs facilitating these tasks, allowing for a seamless experience in achieving the core functional job.



 3. Emotional Jobs


These jobs pertain to how a customer wants to feel or avoid feeling as a result of executing the core functional and related jobs.


Attributes: Often subjective and influenced by individual experiences and perspectives.


Examples: Using the AI writing tool should leave the user feeling confident about the quality and originality of the content, or relieved that it's saving them time.


Prompt Engineer's Role: To design prompts that contribute positively to the user experience, such as by providing encouraging feedback, ensuring ease of use, or creating aesthetically pleasing outputs.

In a world brimming with artificial intelligence, our conversations with technology have become as natural as chatting with a friend. That's where the magic of PromptROI sparkles—a bustling marketplace where talented creators, known as prompt engineers, master the language that turns AI into our most helpful companion.


Imagine each word as a key crafted not just from letters, but from understanding. It's not about algorithms or code at PromptROI; it's about those human touches that make AI feel less like a machine and more like a partner. You, as a prompt engineer looking to develop high-quality prompts that can be monetized, need to be able to shape dialogues with the finesse of poets and bring out the rich potential of AI to answer, assist, and amaze. Every phrase, every question, and every input should be delicately designed to evoke the most coherent, relevant, and engaging AI responses. 


But the question of the day.





How do you create a prompt whose output resonates deeply with the buyer's underlying needs?


The answer?


Jobs-to-be-Done (JTBD) framework!


With this framework, the focus shifts from the constructs of prompts to the heartbeat of customer intent. It's no longer about simply selling words; it's about embedding in every letter, an understanding of the job the customer hires the prompt to perform.

With this subtle yet profound insight, prompt engineers are not just expected to be vendors of queries but to become architects of user experience, tailoring each prompt to harmonize with the symphony of human endeavor and curiosity.



Applying Jobs Theory to Creating AI Prompts for Enhanced User Experience


To effectively implement Jobs Theory in the creation of AI prompts—those textual triggers designed to guide AI interaction—we must shift the focus from the technology itself to the outcomes users desire when they interact with AI. This adjustment ensures that prompts are crafted to guide AI in understanding and fulfilling the specific 'jobs' users expect to complete.



Here are detailed considerations and steps that prompt creators should take to create helpful prompts within the framework of Jobs Theory:



1. Identify the User's 'Job': Before writing a prompt, creators must first identify and understand the 'job'—the ultimate goal the user wants to achieve with the prompt. This involves extensive user research to understand their context, challenges, goals, and workflows.





2. Emphasize Clarity and Context: Design prompts that are clear, concise, and contain sufficient context for the AI to comprehend the user's intent. Ensure that the language used aligns with the user’s thinking and expression style.


3. Anticipate User Needs: Analyze common patterns and scenarios where users might rely on AI. By anticipating these needs, prompt creators can provide templates or guided prompts that lead to desired outcomes with minimal user effort.


4. Provide Options and Flexibility: Since users may have varied ways of expressing their 'jobs', offer a range of prompts that can cater to different user preferences and levels of specificity.



5. Facilitate Nuanced Responses: Create prompts that elicit detailed and nuanced responses from AI. This might involve structuring prompts that lead the AI to ask follow-up questions or prompts that guide the user through a more comprehensive interaction with the AI.




6. Iterate and Refine Prompts: Gather feedback on the effectiveness of the prompts and use such insights to refine and improve them. This iterative process ensures that the prompts remain relevant and continue to efficiently guide AI in completing the user's 'jobs.



7. Measure Success by Outcomes: Evaluate the success of prompts by whether users are able to successfully complete their 'jobs'. Adjust the prompts based on these outcome-oriented metrics.



Example 1: Job - Travel Planning


A user is planning a trip and wants to ensure it's within budget and reflects their interests in art and history.

Relevant prompts could be:


- "Show me a travel itinerary for a 5-day trip focusing on the best art and history sights in Rome on a $1500 budget."
 

Clarity and Context: The prompt is specific about the destination, the trip duration, interests, and budget, providing the AI with detailed parameters to work within.



- "Can you suggest budget-friendly hotels in Paris that are near major art galleries and museums?"


Anticipate User Needs: Based on a common scenario of value-conscious travelers looking for accommodations, the prompt guides the AI to focus on location and cost relative to the user's interests in art.


Example 2: Job - Cooking a Healthy Meal


A user wants to prepare a nutritious dinner quickly with what they have in the fridge.


Relevant prompts could be:


- "Give me a quick, healthy recipe using kale, sweet potatoes, and chicken that I can cook in under 30 minutes."



Emphasize Clarity and Context: This prompt gives the AI a clear directive, mentioning available ingredients and time constraints.



- "Considering I have kale, beans, and quinoa, what can I prepare in less than 20 minutes that's under 500 calories?"



Anticipate User Needs: Here, the user is assumed to value health and time, which is reflected in the prompt specifics of calorie count and preparation time.




Example 3: Job - Fitness Routine


A user seeks an exercise regimen that can be performed at home with limited equipment.



Relevant prompts could be:
- "Design a 30-minute, full-body workout plan for home using resistance bands and a yoga mat."


Facilitate Nuanced Responses: This prompt requests a comprehensive plan indicating the available equipment and time commitment.



- "What are some effective strength training exercises I can do at home without any equipment?"


Provide Options and Flexibility:
By not specifying the duration or intensity, this prompt caters to users looking for a range of possibilities that they can adapt to their skill level or time availability.


Example 4: Job - Entertainment


A user aims to unwind after a long day at work with a movie that matches their mood for something light and humorous.



Relevant prompts could be:
- "Recommend a comedy movie from the last five years that's perfect for relaxing."



Measure Success by Outcomes: The success of this prompt is contingent on the AI selecting a movie that satisfies the user's need to relax with specific genre and time frame parameters.



- "I'm in the mood for a light-hearted film, maybe a romantic comedy. What do you suggest?"



Recognize the Customer


When writing your prompt, you need to first understand who the users of the prompts are going to be and what they aim to achieve. The JTBD framework categorizes customers into three segments:


1. The job executor


2. The product lifecycle support team


3. The buyer


people buying the prompts might be addressing a particular segment at a point in time. So, different prompts could be created for each customer segment, and the output will depend on the particular segment the Prompt is addressing. So as a prompt engineer, you should be able to identify all these and implement them when creating prompts.



Each of these customers has distinct 'jobs' they need to complete, and it is crucial to identify these for prompt design.



Prompts for the Job Executor

Prompts created for the direct users should help them to accomplish their tasks efficiently. They need outputs that are straightforward, actionable, and geared towards solving specific problems they face in their work.

- Example Prompt: "Can you compile a report on the latest market trends for eco-friendly packaging materials?"


Prompts for the Product Lifecycle Support Team


For the support team, the prompt should enable them to gather insights on system performance and user interactions.

- Example Prompt: "What are the common points of confusion for users in navigating our accounting software, based on recent support requests?"


Prompts for the Buyer


People or parties interested in purchasing your AI tool need prompts that help them understand the value and utility of the AI system. These prompts must support decision-making processes, and often highlight the potential return on investment or reveal the alignment of the AI system with strategic goals.



        
-  Example Prompt: "What are the projected savings in time and cost after integrating our AI chatbot into customer service workflows?"



In creating these prompts, prompt designers must understand not only the syntax and mechanics of the AI but also the context and objectives of each customer segment. This nuanced approach ensures that the prompts will deliver the specific types of information or action needed by different user groups, enhancing the relevance and efficacy of the AI's output for each segment.



To implement this understanding effectively:



- Empathy & Research: Prompt engineers should have a deep understanding of the challenges and goals each customer type faces. This often involves user research and persona development.


- Customization: The prompts should be customized to meet the distinct expectations of each user group. For example, while a job executor might need operational information, a product lifecycle support team member will be looking for system performance metrics.


- Testing & Feedback:
Continuous testing with real users from each segment and gathering feedback is essential to refine the prompts and adjust them to better serve the intended purpose.


Understanding these distinctions and applying them when creating prompts will ensure that the AI delivers valuable, customized experiences to each segment, therefore increasing satisfaction, engagement, and overall outcomes.


Define the Jobs


Understanding the five types of 'jobs' within the Jobs-to-be-Done framework is crucial for prompt engineers as it helps create AI prompts that are not only functionally effective but also emotionally resonant, and attuned to the user's entire journey with the product. Below are detailed descriptions of each job type. 


 1. The Core Functional Job


This is the primary task or problem the user is hiring the product or service to accomplish.

- Attributes: It must have clear definitions and metrics for success.


Examples: For an AI writing tool, the core functional job might be to generate an original blog post on a specified topic.


Prompt Engineer's Role: To create prompts that succinctly address the core purpose, enabling the AI to provide relevant and precise results. This includes understanding the specific requirements of this outcome, such as length, topic accuracy, tone, etc.


 2. Related Jobs


These are the ancillary tasks that need to be completed to support or facilitate the core functional job.



- Attributes: They may not be the main reason for hiring the product but are necessary to achieve the end goal.


Examples: In the AI writing tool context, related jobs could include researching relevant keywords, ensuring SEO optimization, and providing citations or sources.


Prompt Engineer's Role: To design prompts that create outputs facilitating these tasks, allowing for a seamless experience in achieving the core functional job.



 3. Emotional Jobs


These jobs pertain to how a customer wants to feel or avoid feeling as a result of executing the core functional and related jobs.


Attributes: Often subjective and influenced by individual experiences and perspectives.


Examples: Using the AI writing tool should leave the user feeling confident about the quality and originality of the content, or relieved that it's saving them time.


Prompt Engineer's Role: To design prompts that contribute positively to the user experience, such as by providing encouraging feedback, ensuring ease of use, or creating aesthetically pleasing outputs.

4. Consumption Chain Jobs


This set of tasks pertains to the customer's interaction with the product or service throughout the entire consumption process, which includes pre-purchase, purchase, and post-purchase experiences.



Attributes: These tasks can be critical barriers or facilitators to product use and customer satisfaction.


Examples: Evaluating the AI tool, signing up or subscribing to the service, learning how to use it effectively, and accessing customer support.


Prompt Engineer's Role: To integrate prompts that guide the user throughout these stages, like onboarding tutorials or prompts to solicit feedback for continuous improvement.


 5. The Purchase Decision Job


This involves the customer's process of determining whether to purchase the product or service.


-  Attributes: It includes gathering information, assessing alternatives, weighing pros and cons, and ultimately making a purchase decision.


-  Examples: Comparing the AI writing tool against competitors, considering pricing models, or assessing the features offered.


-  Prompt Engineer's Role: To structure prompts that demonstrate the value proposition of the product, highlight differentiating features, and answer common questions that arise during the decision-making process.


For prompt engineers, focusing on these five types of jobs means understanding and responding to the full range of human interaction with the technology, from the functional to the emotional and experiential. This approach allows engineers to design prompts that not only address immediate tasks but also support a holistic and satisfying user journey. It’s about creating a user experience where the technical functionality is enriched by the emotional and logistical support desired by customers at different stages of their relationship with the product or service.


Unearth the Desired Outcomes


In the Jobs-to-be-Done (JTBD) framework, understanding the customer's needs is critical. Needs in this context are considered the criteria that customers use to evaluate the success of the job they're trying to get done. These metrics could be functional (e.g., speed, efficiency, reliability) or emotional (e.g., satisfaction, confidence, peace of mind).


Prompt engineers should take the following steps to align prompts with these needs:


Understanding the Jobs and Associated Needs


1.  Conduct Research: Gather data through interviews, surveys, ethnographic studies, or usage data to gain a deep understanding of the jobs your customers are trying to get done.
 
2.  Define Metrics: Identify the metrics customers use to measure successful job completion. These can be quantitative (time taken, cost involved, error rates) or qualitative (ease of use, feel of control, emotional uplift).
 
3.  Map the Entire Journey: Understand the consumption chain, considering the entire customer journey from recognizing a need to selecting a solution, using it, and possibly recommending it.


Developing Empathy


1.  Immersive Experience: Place yourself in the customer's environment to experience the job as they do. Use the product to accomplish the tasks they're trying to complete.
   
2.  Customer Personas: Create detailed personas representing different segments of the user base, including their goals, challenges, and emotional drivers.
   
3.  Emotional Intelligence: Develop emotional intelligence to connect with customers’ feelings, needs, and motivations as they interact with your product.



Building and Refining Prompts


1.  Iteration: Develop multiple versions of prompts targeting the same job but addressing different aspects of the needs. Test these variations to see which best fulfill the customer's criteria for success.


   
2.  Feedback Loops: Create mechanisms for continuous feedback from users, allowing the tweaking and optimization of prompts based on real-world usage and success metrics.


   
3.  Personalization: Implement personalized prompts where possible, using data from the user's previous interactions to refine the performance of the prompts for individual needs.

Bridging Technology and Human Aspiration



1.  Stay Informed: Continuously update your understanding as technology and human aspirations evolve. Needs may shift as markets and technologies develop.
   
2.  Technology as a Means, Not an End: Focus on how technology (AI in this case) can serve as a tool for users to achieve their goals, rather than the impressive nature of technology itself.


3.  Align Purpose with Capability: Ensure that prompts not only evoke the AI's capabilities but do so in a way that aligns directly with the user's purpose and needs.



By approaching prompt creation with empathy and a deep understanding of the user's needs and jobs, prompt engineers can craft AI interactions that provide tangible value, resonating with users and standing out in the marketplace. This focus on the human side of technology bridges the gap between sophisticated AI capabilities and the real-world applications that people care about, resulting in a product that users will appreciate, adopt, and advocate for.



Conclusion



Prompt engineers have a critical mission: to align the prompts they develop with the nuanced and often unvoiced needs of end-users. By adopting the Jobs-to-be-Done framework, they can sidestep the industry's common cacophony of misaligned products and step into a realm where customers find their needs intuitively understood and met.


The JTBD framework instills a disciplined approach to understanding customer jobs—functionally, emotionally, and across the consumption chain. By incorporating this framework, prompt engineers can design not just a product, but a catalyst for customer satisfaction and success.


In their hands lies the potential to transform the AI marketplace from a cacophony of missed hits and trials into an orchestra of innovation that truly resonates with the needs and aspirations of its users.

4. Consumption Chain Jobs


This set of tasks pertains to the customer's interaction with the product or service throughout the entire consumption process, which includes pre-purchase, purchase, and post-purchase experiences.



Attributes: These tasks can be critical barriers or facilitators to product use and customer satisfaction.


Examples: Evaluating the AI tool, signing up or subscribing to the service, learning how to use it effectively, and accessing customer support.


Prompt Engineer's Role: To integrate prompts that guide the user throughout these stages, like onboarding tutorials or prompts to solicit feedback for continuous improvement.


 5. The Purchase Decision Job


This involves the customer's process of determining whether to purchase the product or service.


-  Attributes: It includes gathering information, assessing alternatives, weighing pros and cons, and ultimately making a purchase decision.


-  Examples: Comparing the AI writing tool against competitors, considering pricing models, or assessing the features offered.


-  Prompt Engineer's Role: To structure prompts that demonstrate the value proposition of the product, highlight differentiating features, and answer common questions that arise during the decision-making process.


For prompt engineers, focusing on these five types of jobs means understanding and responding to the full range of human interaction with the technology, from the functional to the emotional and experiential. This approach allows engineers to design prompts that not only address immediate tasks but also support a holistic and satisfying user journey. It’s about creating a user experience where the technical functionality is enriched by the emotional and logistical support desired by customers at different stages of their relationship with the product or service.


Unearth the Desired Outcomes


In the Jobs-to-be-Done (JTBD) framework, understanding the customer's needs is critical. Needs in this context are considered the criteria that customers use to evaluate the success of the job they're trying to get done. These metrics could be functional (e.g., speed, efficiency, reliability) or emotional (e.g., satisfaction, confidence, peace of mind).


Prompt engineers should take the following steps to align prompts with these needs:


Understanding the Jobs and Associated Needs


1.  Conduct Research: Gather data through interviews, surveys, ethnographic studies, or usage data to gain a deep understanding of the jobs your customers are trying to get done.
 
2.  Define Metrics: Identify the metrics customers use to measure successful job completion. These can be quantitative (time taken, cost involved, error rates) or qualitative (ease of use, feel of control, emotional uplift).
 
3.  Map the Entire Journey: Understand the consumption chain, considering the entire customer journey from recognizing a need to selecting a solution, using it, and possibly recommending it.


Developing Empathy


1.  Immersive Experience: Place yourself in the customer's environment to experience the job as they do. Use the product to accomplish the tasks they're trying to complete.
   
2.  Customer Personas: Create detailed personas representing different segments of the user base, including their goals, challenges, and emotional drivers.
   
3.  Emotional Intelligence: Develop emotional intelligence to connect with customers’ feelings, needs, and motivations as they interact with your product.



Building and Refining Prompts


1.  Iteration: Develop multiple versions of prompts targeting the same job but addressing different aspects of the needs. Test these variations to see which best fulfill the customer's criteria for success.


   
2.  Feedback Loops: Create mechanisms for continuous feedback from users, allowing the tweaking and optimization of prompts based on real-world usage and success metrics.


   
3.  Personalization: Implement personalized prompts where possible, using data from the user's previous interactions to refine the performance of the prompts for individual needs.

Bridging Technology and Human Aspiration



1.  Stay Informed: Continuously update your understanding as technology and human aspirations evolve. Needs may shift as markets and technologies develop.
   
2.  Technology as a Means, Not an End: Focus on how technology (AI in this case) can serve as a tool for users to achieve their goals, rather than the impressive nature of technology itself.


3.  Align Purpose with Capability: Ensure that prompts not only evoke the AI's capabilities but do so in a way that aligns directly with the user's purpose and needs.



By approaching prompt creation with empathy and a deep understanding of the user's needs and jobs, prompt engineers can craft AI interactions that provide tangible value, resonating with users and standing out in the marketplace. This focus on the human side of technology bridges the gap between sophisticated AI capabilities and the real-world applications that people care about, resulting in a product that users will appreciate, adopt, and advocate for.



Conclusion



Prompt engineers have a critical mission: to align the prompts they develop with the nuanced and often unvoiced needs of end-users. By adopting the Jobs-to-be-Done framework, they can sidestep the industry's common cacophony of misaligned products and step into a realm where customers find their needs intuitively understood and met.


The JTBD framework instills a disciplined approach to understanding customer jobs—functionally, emotionally, and across the consumption chain. By incorporating this framework, prompt engineers can design not just a product, but a catalyst for customer satisfaction and success.


In their hands lies the potential to transform the AI marketplace from a cacophony of missed hits and trials into an orchestra of innovation that truly resonates with the needs and aspirations of its users.

4. Consumption Chain Jobs


This set of tasks pertains to the customer's interaction with the product or service throughout the entire consumption process, which includes pre-purchase, purchase, and post-purchase experiences.



Attributes: These tasks can be critical barriers or facilitators to product use and customer satisfaction.


Examples: Evaluating the AI tool, signing up or subscribing to the service, learning how to use it effectively, and accessing customer support.


Prompt Engineer's Role: To integrate prompts that guide the user throughout these stages, like onboarding tutorials or prompts to solicit feedback for continuous improvement.


 5. The Purchase Decision Job


This involves the customer's process of determining whether to purchase the product or service.


-  Attributes: It includes gathering information, assessing alternatives, weighing pros and cons, and ultimately making a purchase decision.


-  Examples: Comparing the AI writing tool against competitors, considering pricing models, or assessing the features offered.


-  Prompt Engineer's Role: To structure prompts that demonstrate the value proposition of the product, highlight differentiating features, and answer common questions that arise during the decision-making process.


For prompt engineers, focusing on these five types of jobs means understanding and responding to the full range of human interaction with the technology, from the functional to the emotional and experiential. This approach allows engineers to design prompts that not only address immediate tasks but also support a holistic and satisfying user journey. It’s about creating a user experience where the technical functionality is enriched by the emotional and logistical support desired by customers at different stages of their relationship with the product or service.


Unearth the Desired Outcomes


In the Jobs-to-be-Done (JTBD) framework, understanding the customer's needs is critical. Needs in this context are considered the criteria that customers use to evaluate the success of the job they're trying to get done. These metrics could be functional (e.g., speed, efficiency, reliability) or emotional (e.g., satisfaction, confidence, peace of mind).


Prompt engineers should take the following steps to align prompts with these needs:


Understanding the Jobs and Associated Needs


1.  Conduct Research: Gather data through interviews, surveys, ethnographic studies, or usage data to gain a deep understanding of the jobs your customers are trying to get done.
 
2.  Define Metrics: Identify the metrics customers use to measure successful job completion. These can be quantitative (time taken, cost involved, error rates) or qualitative (ease of use, feel of control, emotional uplift).
 
3.  Map the Entire Journey: Understand the consumption chain, considering the entire customer journey from recognizing a need to selecting a solution, using it, and possibly recommending it.


Developing Empathy


1.  Immersive Experience: Place yourself in the customer's environment to experience the job as they do. Use the product to accomplish the tasks they're trying to complete.
   
2.  Customer Personas: Create detailed personas representing different segments of the user base, including their goals, challenges, and emotional drivers.
   
3.  Emotional Intelligence: Develop emotional intelligence to connect with customers’ feelings, needs, and motivations as they interact with your product.



Building and Refining Prompts


1.  Iteration: Develop multiple versions of prompts targeting the same job but addressing different aspects of the needs. Test these variations to see which best fulfill the customer's criteria for success.


   
2.  Feedback Loops: Create mechanisms for continuous feedback from users, allowing the tweaking and optimization of prompts based on real-world usage and success metrics.


   
3.  Personalization: Implement personalized prompts where possible, using data from the user's previous interactions to refine the performance of the prompts for individual needs.

Bridging Technology and Human Aspiration



1.  Stay Informed: Continuously update your understanding as technology and human aspirations evolve. Needs may shift as markets and technologies develop.
   
2.  Technology as a Means, Not an End: Focus on how technology (AI in this case) can serve as a tool for users to achieve their goals, rather than the impressive nature of technology itself.


3.  Align Purpose with Capability: Ensure that prompts not only evoke the AI's capabilities but do so in a way that aligns directly with the user's purpose and needs.



By approaching prompt creation with empathy and a deep understanding of the user's needs and jobs, prompt engineers can craft AI interactions that provide tangible value, resonating with users and standing out in the marketplace. This focus on the human side of technology bridges the gap between sophisticated AI capabilities and the real-world applications that people care about, resulting in a product that users will appreciate, adopt, and advocate for.



Conclusion



Prompt engineers have a critical mission: to align the prompts they develop with the nuanced and often unvoiced needs of end-users. By adopting the Jobs-to-be-Done framework, they can sidestep the industry's common cacophony of misaligned products and step into a realm where customers find their needs intuitively understood and met.


The JTBD framework instills a disciplined approach to understanding customer jobs—functionally, emotionally, and across the consumption chain. By incorporating this framework, prompt engineers can design not just a product, but a catalyst for customer satisfaction and success.


In their hands lies the potential to transform the AI marketplace from a cacophony of missed hits and trials into an orchestra of innovation that truly resonates with the needs and aspirations of its users.

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support@promptroi.com